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Genealogy Data Page 14 (Notes Pages)

For privacy reasons, Date of Birth and Date of Marriage for persons believed to still be living are not shown.

Kuykendall, Joseph Joe (b. 31 DEC 1870, d. 14 MAR 1957)

Death: 14 MAR 1957

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Kuykendall, Flave Holcome (b. 28 AUG 1872, d. 5 SEP 1942)
Death: 5 SEP 1942

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Kuykendall, Thadeus Thad (b. 29 MAR 1874, d. FEB 1919)
Death: FEB 1919

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Kuykendall, Singleton (b. , d. ?)
Death: --Not Shown--

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Buckner, Ethel (b. 9 MAR 1883, d. 22 JUL 1975)
Death: 22 JUL 1975

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Kuykendall, Clyde (b. , d. ?)
Death: --Not Shown--

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Allen, Eller (b. 6 FEB 1873, d. 1 MAY 1957)
Death: 1 MAY 1957

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Kuykendall, Mae (b. 21 JUN 1892, d. 6 JUN 1971)
Death: 6 JUN 1971

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Kuykendall, Annie (b. 22 AUG 1895, d. 13 JUL 1966)
Death: 13 JUL 1966

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Kuykendall, Roy Lee (b. 1 JUN 1898, d. 17 OCT 1971)
Death: 17 OCT 1971

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Davis, Annie Mae (b. , d. AUG 1964)
Death: AUG 1964

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Kuykendall, Grace (b. 25 JUL 1902, d. 22 DEC 1954)
Death: 22 DEC 1954

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Robinson, Joseph Joe (b. 6 APR 1905, d. 24 DEC 1964)
Death: 24 DEC 1964

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Kuykendall, Lottie (b. , d. 8 MAY 1979)
Death: 8 MAY 1979

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Corn, Martha Salina (b. 5 AUG 1854, d. 2 NOV 1942)
Death: 2 NOV 1942 Alexander's Chapel, Buncombe Co. NC

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Stepp, Thomas T. (b. 15 NOV 1853, d. 15 APR 1948)
Death: 15 APR 1948

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Stepp, Cordelia Haseltine (b. 16 JUN 1879, d. 21 MAR 1917)
Death: 21 MAR 1917

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Brown, Bessie (b. 2 JAN 1897, d. 29 AUG 1916)
Death: 29 AUG 1916

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Brown, Grace (b. 25 AUG 1898, d. 31 OCT 1915)
Death: 31 OCT 1915

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Corn, Alfred E. (b. 19 JAN 1817, d. 16 JUL 1905)
Note: A short write-up, taken from the "History of the Baptist Denomination in
Ga", page 143,
"In the early part of this century in the State of North Carolina a child
used to preach, in a childish way, from a childish pulpit, and to a
childish audience beneath the shade of a plum-tree. As serious as
Deacons, sat the juvenile audience: as solemn as an old divine, the
speaker demeaned himself. In after years he became a preacher in reality,
by whom Hundreds have been baptized, and through whose instrumentality
thousands have been converted.
His name was Alfred Corn, who was born in Buncombe Co, NC (present day
Henderson) and it was later, in his 19th year, that he became a subject
of "regenerating grace"; even the day and place are know. It occurred on
the 22nd day of June 1837 at Waynesville, NC> In September 1841 he and
his brother Joh, joined the Baptist Church at Macedonia, Towns Co.,
Georgia and were baptized by their own father Rev. Adam Corn whose
ministry extended through a period of seventy years. Of that church (in
Macedonia) the elder John was afterwards pastor, becoming a preacher of
great power and success and rising to such a height in the esteem of his
brethren and fellow citizens that, before his death, he was elected
Moderator of the Hiwassee Association and a member of the Georgia
Legislature. This youngest son, however, was ordained at Antioch Church,
Union Co., Georgia in October 1850.
During twenty-two years of his ministerial life, Rev.. Alfred Corn was a
faithful and laborious missionary, under the appointment, first, of the
Hiwassee Baptist Assoc., Georgia; then at the Domestic and Indian Mission
Board (now the Home Mission Board) of the Georgia Baptist Convention. A
large part of his ministry was missionary labor, expended among the
Cherokee Indians in Western NC, to whom he had preached through an
interpreter, and may of whom were converted. In addition to this work he
has served various churches in NC, and Georgia, as Pastor- one being the
Union Church, Towns Co., Ga., Moderator of the Hiwassee Association.. His
life has ben usefully spent in preaching the Gospel, in building up and
establishing churches, and in extending an perpetuating the redeemer's
cause and Kingdom in the world."
.
Mrs. A.J. Ritchie says:
"Uncle Alfred did a large part of his work among the Cherokee Indians in
Western NC, to whom he preached through an interpreter. He lived near the
Indian Mission School, which was established at the insistence of
Cherokee Dick, a prominent mixed blooded Chief, who had translated the
New Testament into the Cherokee language. This school was set aside
during the period when they owed all the territory. Along with Uncle
Alfred we know too, that my grandfather John Corn and Humphrey Posey
played a wonderful part in improving the education of these people. They
knew their language, and Uncle Alfred would tell us about this work and
quote us many sayings in their language. He would also sing us their
songs.
"Uncle Alfred's second wife Amanda Mathewson, lived to be nearly 90 and
she is buried in Toccoa, Ga. We called Uncle Alfred "Pappy Corn" and all
his children, grandchildren and even neighbors called him this endearing
term. He and his first wife are buried, side by side, in Union church
Cemetery near their old home and where their church membership had been
for many years."
.
Alfred and two others ( George Plott and John Bryson) were the first
white men to settle in what was called Brasstown Valley, He preached to
the Indians in their language and John Bryson, the father-in-law of
Alfred's daughter Arminta J. built the first house in Brasstown, while
George Plott built a home nearby. Corn Creek was also named for Alfred.
He became the second pastor of their Union Baptist Church and with his
strong hands on the reins, he guided her for 20 years.
They purchased the land from a Lumpkin county
Death: 16 JUL 1905

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