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Genealogy Data Page 21 (Notes Pages)

For privacy reasons, Date of Birth and Date of Marriage for persons believed to still be living are not shown.

Corn, Charles Norman (b. 28 MAR 1925, d. 13 DEC 1952)

Death: 13 DEC 1952 Ebenezer Church Cemetery, Henderson Co., NC

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Corn, Hazel Mae (b. 21 JUL 1928, d. 20 MAY 1953)
Death: 20 MAY 1953 Ebenezer Church Cemetery, Henderson Co., NC

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Corn, Arthur Ray (b. 9 AUG 1914, d. ?)
Note: Arthur Ray was in WWII and enlisted at Ft. Bragg with 62 others from
Henderson Co., When they departed on Aug 1, 1942, all were listed in the
local Paper, along with the item that "Florida Beaches open only in
day-light". This a reminder of WWII jitters along the eastern coast.
.
Married the widow of his brother Charles

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Newman, Herman Lonnie (b. 12 MAY 1873, d. 14 MAY 1946)
Death: 14 MAY 1946 Ebenezer Church Cemetery, Henderson Co., NC

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Corn, Geoge W. (b. BET. 1828 - 1829, d. ?)
Death: --Not Shown--

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Corn, Ezekiel W. (b. BET. 1829 - 1830, d. 1865)
Death: 1865 in Dakota Terr., during Civil War

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Corn, Daniel E. (b. 1835, d. ?)
Death: --Not Shown--

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Corn, Dock G (b. 1838, d. ?)
Note: Sometimes known as Benjamin Franklin, sometimes as DBF Corn

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Corn, Noah Parr Middleton (b. 5 DEC 1845, d. 23 MAR 1919)
Death: 23 MAR 1919

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Galloway, Cynthia Carolyn (b. 12 AUG 1828, d. 6 MAR 1908)
Death: 6 MAR 1908

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Jones, Captain Robert (b. 1794, d. 1890)
Death: 1890

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Corn, John Roland (b. 21 SEP 1818, d. 1865)
Note: They lived in NC until his marriage and birth of two children (Martin
b1841 and Zelda, b.1843) They also moved to Tennessee in time for the
1860 Census and then on to Texas, but between 1845 and 1859 lived in
Georgia, where so many Corn descendants of John Peter Corn moved to.
Death: 1865 Civil War, buried in Texas

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Corn, Robert (b. 21 FEB 1822, d. SEP 1914)
Death: SEP 1914

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Corn, Silas(?) (b. BET. 1825 - 1830, d. 1830)
Death: 1830

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Corn, Mathew Dewitt (b. 2 OCT 1832, d. 20 JUN 1896)
Death: 20 JUN 1896 London, Kentucky

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Corn, Susan Annie (b. 1855, d. 1891)
Death: 1891

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Corn, Hiram King (b. 1838, d. 1919)
Death: 1919

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Corn, Mary Ann (b. 17 FEB 1842, d. 1919)
Death: 1919

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Corn, Martin Van Buren (b. 16 OCT 1841, d. 30 SEP 1915)
Note: Martin V. Corn , and his wife and seven children came to the Territory of
New Mexico in 1879. They came in a covered wagon caravan with seven other
stockmen and their families.
The men of the caravan who shared the expenses and responsibilities of
the journey, were Bill and Ed Hudson, Bill Holloman, Lon Spencer, Ike
Tooters, and a man by the name of Horn who drove the cattle and was
leader of the caravan.
While it was a long tiresome journey across the dry treeless plains and
especially trying on the women, there were camp pleasures shared by all
members of the caravan in frequent stops, and around camp fires in the
cool of the evenings, when they would tell stories of adventure and sing
rollicking songs and hymns. The children played games and explored
around, but never ventured far from sight of the men who were prepared to
protect their
families with six-shooters and Winchesters kept loaded and close at hand
in case of sudden attack by hostile Indians.
While other stockmen lost entire herds, that were driven away by the
Indians, and even teams used by some travelers for their wagons were
stolen, the caravan of which Mr. Corn was a member, lost nothing, because
of their preparedness against attack.
Children or Mr. Corn's now grown and heads of families, tell interesting
stories of incidents of that caravan journey. At the beginning of the
never-to-be-forgotten trip they had their first
tin-type pictures taken, and at the end; tragedy overtook them after
they made camp at old Seven Rivers, Nearly all the men had gone on to
Roswell and Lincoln prospecting, when the man left in charge got in a
quarrel and Ike Tooters was killed by one of the Hudson brothers which
caused much excitement and furnished a victim for the widely known "Boot
Cemetery" at Seven Rivers where many murdered men were buried with boots
on.
Mr. Corn on arriving at South Spring five miles southeast of Roswell was
favorably impressed with that section of the country as being what he
desired for stock raising, and farming.
John Chisum had established the Jingle Bob Ranche at the head of South
Spring River and had built a comfortable twelve room adobe home. Between
fifteen and twenty thousand head of Chisum cattle, marked with the
dangling ear bob, roamed the unfenced plains for hundreds of miles, and
fed on fine grazing lands of the Pecos River Valley.
Roswell then, with its two Adobe buildings, the store and hotel, both
owned by Captain Joseph C. Lea, was no more inviting than the country
around South Spring where Mr. Corn decided to remain.
He took out homestead and timber culture claims, just north of the Chisum
holdings, and later bought adjoining land, making 384 acres in one tract.
During the fall of 1879 Mr. Corn , A. O. Spencer, Bill Holloman, and
James H. Hampton took out the old Texas Irrigation Ditch from South
Spring River, below the Chisum Ranch. The irrigated soil proved very
productive.
In 1890 John Chisum went to Mr. Corn one day, and said, "Corn I'll make
you a proposition, if you will set out trees along your ditch I'll get
the trees, for we need then for shade on these hot dry plains." Mr.
Chisum, on securing Mr. Corn's agreement to his proposition, sent two ox
wagons to Alpine, Texas, in the Davis Mountains, and got the cottonwood
and willow tress. Mr. Corn set them out on the south side of the lane and
Oregon Bell on
the north side, on land he owned and afterwards sold to John W. Poe and
is now L. F. D. Ranche of the J. P. White estate. The trees grew and Mr.
Corn and his daughter Mary and their old darky servant called "Nigger
Dick", cared for them and set out pruning until the beautiful lane
extended for over a mile, from east to west, and has been a beauty spot
and favorite drive for young people, especially lovers, for nearly sixty
years.
It was told by J. P. White just before his death, that of all the
thousands
Death: 30 SEP 1915 Roswell, NM

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Hampton, Mary Jane Nichols (b. , d. ?)
Note: widow of a Civil War friend

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